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Fig Jam: Marmellata di Ficchi

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Crostata di marmellata ai fichi / Rustic Jam Tart with Fig jam

Italian Food and Flavours

P1160628 (2)

Crostata di marmellata ai fichi / Rustic Jam Tart with Fig jam
Serves 6
The humble Crostata is a very popular cake in le Marche households. Crostata di marmellata ai fichi was the first Italian 'dolce' I made. After dismissing it as just a jam tart I was presented with a home made version by an Italian lady who proudly told me that the secret was the quality of the marmellata ( jam ) made with fresh fruit. I have had many compliments on my own homemade fig jam flavoured with lemons, Cinnamon and mixed spice and always make too many jars so this time of year what better than to raid the store cupboard and produce this easy and decorative, lattice topped desert!
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. 250 g plain flour (00)
  2. 100g butter
  3. 80g sugar
  4. 1 level tsp baking powder
  5. 1 egg
Instructions
  1. Measure the flour and the baking powder into a large bowl. Make sure the butter is not straight from the fridge but still fairly firm before rubbing it into the flour with your fingertips. Mix in the sugar and making a well in the centre add the beaten egg. With your hands start mixing the egg into the flour mixture, adding approximately one tablespoon of water to help bind the ingredients into a ball of pastry dough. Roll out about two thirds of the pastry to line a loose bottomed tart tin and place in the fridge to rest for an hour or so, along with the remaining pastry.
  2. Then spread your chosen jam thickly onto the base. Roll out the remaining pastry and using a pastry cutter or knife cut long strips to create a lattice effect on the top. Bake at 180 degrees centigrade for about half an hour or until the pastry is golden.
Notes
  1. Crostata di marmellata ai fichi keeps well for a few days and can also be frozen. Even better, give as a gift or share with friends.
Cooking Holidays Italy http://www.italianfoodandflavours.com/
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If they’re good enough for the gods…

Italian Food and Flavours

Autumn fruits and religion seem to go hand in hand through myth and legend.

According to mythology the fig tree was created by Gaia the Mother Earth, to hide her son Syceus who was a giant fleeing from the wrath of Zeus. Perhaps that explains why each year I am faced with pruning back a gigantic amount of new wood growth on my trees!

Adam and Eve supposedly covered their nakedness using fig leaves but I bet they regretted that move as fig leaf sap is notorious for causing terrible blisters when combined with sunlight!

In Greek and Roman mythology Dionysus (Bacchus to the Romans), God of wine and fertility, and Priapus, a Satyr who symbolized sexual desire are both connected with the fig which probably goes some way to explain it’s less than savoury use in the local dialect!

Even the Buddha has a connection with the fig as apparently he achieved enlightenment one day in 528 BC while sitting under a Bo tree. The Bo is a kind of fig.

Almonds also have a special place in legend and folklore and are given, strictly  in odd numbers, as tokens of hope and good fortune in religious ceremonies around the world.

The Romans showered newlyweds with almonds as a fertility charm, sugared almonds are still presented to wedding guests today in Italy and elsewhere.

According to the Bible the almond tree is a symbol of divine approval. At Christmas time in Sweden they eat a cinnamon-flavoured rice-pudding with an almond hidden inside. The lucky finder gets good luck for the year, always assuming they didn’t choke on it first!

Here in Italy at Christmas time the tradition is to give ‘Torrone’ as a gift. Torrone is a type of confectionary, typically made from honey, sugar and egg-white and toasted almonds. It’s chewy, delicious, bringing good luck to all who eat it and I’m fairly certain that it goes some way to pay for Dentists’ skiing holidays in January…

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